Image from page 250 of “The domestic encyclopaedia : or, A dictionary of facts, and useful knowledge: comprehending a concise view of the latest discoveries, inventions, and improvements ; chiefly applicable to rural and domestic economy ; together with d

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Image from page 250 of “The domestic encyclopaedia : or, A dictionary of facts, and useful knowledge: comprehending a concise view of the latest discoveries, inventions, and improvements ; chiefly applicable to rural and domestic economy ; together with d
U.S technology
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Identifier: 101527562X1.nlm.nih.gov
Title: The domestic encyclopaedia : or, A dictionary of facts, and useful knowledge: comprehending a concise view of the latest discoveries, inventions, and improvements ; chiefly applicable to rural and domestic economy ; together with descriptions of the most interesting objects of nature and art ; the history of men and animals, in a state of health or disease ; and practical hints respecting the arts and manufactures, both familiar and commercial ; illustrated with numerous engravings and cuts ; in five volumes ; volume I[-V (Volume 1)
Year: 1803 (1800s)
Authors: Willich, A. F. M. (Anthony Florian Madinger) Mease, James, 1771-1846, editor Birch, William Young, 1764-1837, publisher Small, Abraham, 1764?-1829, publisher Carr, Robert, 1778-1866, printer Shallus, Francis, engraver T. & J. Swords (Firm), publisher
Subjects: Technology Housekeeping Medicine
Publisher: Philadelphia : Published by William Young Birch, and Abraham Small, no. 17, South Second-Street : and T. & J. Swords, New-York Robert Carr, printer
Contributing Library: U.S. National Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons, U.S. National Library of Medicine

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milies at a distance from a me-tropolis v and as we have no per-sonal acquaintance with this inge-nious artisan, we cannot be sus-pected of partiality : indeed, thefirst account of his invention, to-gether with a plate, was commu-nicated to us by means of a foreignjournal, lately imported. Lastly, it deserves to be noticed,that the prevailing custom of pro-viding the bedsteads of childrenwith curtains, is liable to strongand serious objections : 1. Becausethey prevent a free access of air forthe renewal of that mass which hasbeen rendered unfit for respiration ;2. They endanger the lives of in-fants by candle-light, from whichfatal accidents have frequently hap-pened ; and 3. They are perniciousreceptacles for the finest particlesof dust, which, as we have alreadyobserved (See Bed), are inhaledby the person confined within suchcurtains, on the least motion of thebedstead: and thence, perhaps,many young and blooming inno-cents may date the first period oftheir consumptive attack. We do

Text Appearing After Image:
Bedstead for the Sick & Wofkbed, JZJL,! , BED BEE 225 not, however, mean to insinuate,that curtains ought to be universal-ly abandoned, as there may occura variety of instances, in whichthe laws of propriety and decorum, interrupted by the noise of day.Yet, even literati and artists, oughtto pay due attention to this import-ant circumstance, that the atmo-sphere of the night is always more might render them useful and ne- vitiated, and consequently less fit cessary. f°r respiration, than that of a serene BED-TIME, or that period of day; and as we respire a greater the evening or night, when we re- portion of air while awake, than in tire to enjoy the necessary repose, a sleeping state, it follows that the Although it would be difficult, in system must be more injured in the the present irregular state of socie- former than in the latter case. ty, to lay down rules for the propertime of resorting to that placewhichsuspends and makes us forget ourdaily troubles and cares ; yet, whe

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US Navy Day 2014_140416-N-IZ292-147
U.S technology
Image by U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/U.S. Fifth Fleet
NAVAL SUPPORT ACTIVITY BAHRAIN (Apr. 16, 2014) Wayne Pavalko, a science advisor for U.S. Naval Forces Central Command demonstrates robotics technology to Bahraini middle school students during Navy Day. Navy Day attendees witnessed demonstrations, toured Navy ships and vehicles, and collected informational items from display stations. Navy Day is part of American Bahraini Friendship Week, which was created to honor the long-standing relationship between the United States and the Kingdom of Bahrain. Bahraini Friendship week featured activities in various locations across the island and aimed at fostering economic and cultural ties between the United States and Bahrain. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Felicito Rustique/Released)

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