Nice U.S Technology photos

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Image from page 99 of “The domestic encyclopaedia : or, A dictionary of facts, and useful knowledge: comprehending a concise view of the latest discoveries, inventions, and improvements ; chiefly applicable to rural and domestic economy ; together with de
U.S technology
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: 101527562X4.nlm.nih.gov
Title: The domestic encyclopaedia : or, A dictionary of facts, and useful knowledge: comprehending a concise view of the latest discoveries, inventions, and improvements ; chiefly applicable to rural and domestic economy ; together with descriptions of the most interesting objects of nature and art ; the history of men and animals, in a state of health or disease ; and practical hints respecting the arts and manufactures, both familiar and commercial ; illustrated with numerous engravings and cuts ; in five volumes ; volume I[-V (Volume 4)
Year: 1803 (1800s)
Authors: Willich, A. F. M. (Anthony Florian Madinger) Mease, James, 1771-1846, editor Birch, William Young, 1764-1837, publisher Small, Abraham, 1764?-1829, publisher Carr, Robert, 1778-1866, printer Shallus, Francis, engraver T. & J. Swords (Firm), publisher
Subjects: Technology Housekeeping Medicine
Publisher: Philadelphia : Published by William Young Birch, and Abraham Small, no. 17, South Second-Street : and T. & J. Swords, New-York Robert Carr, printer
Contributing Library: U.S. National Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons, U.S. National Library of Medicine

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Text Appearing Before Image:
Figure 2.

Text Appearing After Image:
MIL MIL 85 MILK-THISTLE, or Ladies Thistle, Cardials ?narianus, L.an indigenous plant, growing onditch-banks, road-sides, the bor-ders of cornfields, and on rubbish:it flowers in the month of August.Though often a very troublesomeweed in pasture and other lands,the milk thistle may be eaten inthe spring as a salad :-and the ten-der stalks, if peeled and soaked inwater to extract their bitterness,afford a delicious dish : the scalesof the flower-cup may be used asa substitute for artichokes; andthe roots, as well as the leaves,while young, are wholesome food.Rabbits, likewise, are exceedinglyfond of the leaves and stalks ofthe milk-thistle, which tend topreserve their health, when keptin a domestic state. MILK-VETCH, or Astragali^L. a genus of indigenous, peren-nial plants, consisting of 80 spe-cies ; the principal of which, isthe glycyphyllos, Common or SweetMilk-vetch, Liquorice-vetch, Wild-liquorice, or Liquorice Cocks-head : it grows in meadows, pas-tures, and on ditch-banks, where

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: P-40 Warhawk, SR-71 Blackbird, Naval Aircraft Factory N3N seaplane, Space Shuttle Enterprise
U.S technology
Image by Chris Devers
Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Curtiss P-40E Warhawk (Kittyhawk IA):

Whether known as the Warhawk, Tomahawk, or Kittyhawk, the Curtiss P-40 proved to be a successful, versatile fighter during the first half of World War II. The shark-mouthed Tomahawks that Gen. Claire Chennault’s "Flying Tigers" flew in China against the Japanese remain among the most popular airplanes of the war. P-40E pilot Lt. Boyd D. Wagner became the first American ace of World War II when he shot down six Japanese aircraft in the Philippines in mid-December 1941.

Curtiss-Wright built this airplane as Model 87-A3 and delivered it to Canada as a Kittyhawk I in 1941. It served until 1946 in No. 111 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force. U.S. Air Force personnel at Andrews Air Force Base restored it in 1975 to represent an aircraft of the 75th Fighter Squadron, 23rd Fighter Group, 14th Air Force.

Donated by the Exchange Club in Memory of Kellis Forbes.

Manufacturer:
Curtiss Aircraft Company

Date:
1939

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 330 x 970cm, 2686kg, 1140cm (10ft 9 15/16in. x 31ft 9 7/8in., 5921.6lb., 37ft 4 13/16in.)

Materials:
All-metal, semi-monocoque

Physical Description:
Single engine, single seat, fighter aircraft.

• • • • •

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird:

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in more hostile airspace or with such complete impunity than the SR-71, the world’s fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time during 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its last flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kilometers (2,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane over to the Smithsonian.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Designer:
Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson

Date:

1964

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 55ft 7in. x 107ft 5in., 169998.5lb. (5.638m x 16.942m x 32.741m, 77110.8kg)
Other: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 107ft 5in. x 55ft 7in. (5.638m x 32.741m x 16.942m)

Materials:
Titanium

Physical Description:
Twin-engine, two-seat, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft; airframe constructed largley of titanium and its alloys; vertical tail fins are constructed of a composite (laminated plastic-type material) to reduce radar cross-section; Pratt and Whitney J58 (JT11D-20B) turbojet engines feature large inlet shock cones.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Naval Aircraft Factory N3N:

In 1934 the Naval Aircraft Factory in Philadelphia was tasked to manufacture a new primary trainer for the U.S. Navy. Following successful tests, this little biplane trainer was built in both land and seaplane versions. The Navy initially ordered 179 N3N-1 models, and the factory began producing more than 800 N3N-3 models in 1938. U.S. Navy primary flight training schools used N3Ns extensively throughout World War II. A few of the seaplane version were retained for primary training at the U.S. Naval Academy. In 1961 they became the last biplanes retired from U.S. military service.

This N3N-3 was transferred from Cherry Point to Annapolis in 1946, where it served as a seaplane trainer. It was restored and displayed at the Naval Academy Museum before being transferred here.

Transferred from the United States Navy

Manufacturer:
Naval Aircraft Factory

Date:
1941

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 10ft 9 15/16in. x 25ft 7 1/16in. x 34ft 1 7/16in., 2090lb. (330 x 780 x 1040cm, 948kg)

Materials:
bolted steel-tube fuselage construction with removable side panels wings, also constructed internally of all metal, covered with fabric like the fuselage and tail.

Physical Description:
Bright yellow bi-plane, hand crank start. Cockpit instrumentation consists of an altimeter, tachometer, airspeed indicator, compass, turn and bank indicator, and a combination fuel and oil temperature and pressure gauge, floats.

• • • • •

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Space Shuttle Enterprise:

Manufacturer:
Rockwell International Corporation

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 57 ft. tall x 122 ft. long x 78 ft. wing span, 150,000 lb.
(1737.36 x 3718.57 x 2377.44cm, 68039.6kg)

Materials:
Aluminum airframe and body with some fiberglass features; payload bay doors are graphite epoxy composite; thermal tiles are simulated (polyurethane foam) except for test samples of actual tiles and thermal blankets.

The first Space Shuttle orbiter, "Enterprise," is a full-scale test vehicle used for flights in the atmosphere and tests on the ground; it is not equipped for spaceflight. Although the airframe and flight control elements are like those of the Shuttles flown in space, this vehicle has no propulsion system and only simulated thermal tiles because these features were not needed for atmospheric and ground tests. "Enterprise" was rolled out at Rockwell International’s assembly facility in Palmdale, California, in 1976. In 1977, it entered service for a nine-month-long approach-and-landing test flight program. Thereafter it was used for vibration tests and fit checks at NASA centers, and it also appeared in the 1983 Paris Air Show and the 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans. In 1985, NASA transferred "Enterprise" to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum.

Transferred from National Aeronautics and Space Administration

U.S. Army Firefighter’s Integrated Suit-Combat (FIS-C)
U.S technology
Image by Program Executive Office Soldier
The U.S. Army Firefighter’s Integrated Suit-Combat (FIS-C) protects military firefighters in accordance with National Fire Protection Association standards and provides CB protection during firefighting. The FIS-C consists of proximity coat, proximity trousers, gloves, helmet, standard firefighting boots, Nomex balaclava, self-contained breathing apparatus with chemical kit, Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) overgarment, CB gloves/liners and carrying bag.

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